Disney to Fight Against Childhood Obesity by Banning Junk-Food Ads

Written by: Kristiina Yang

Iger and Obama pose with Mickey Mouse

Disney CEO Robert Iger and First Lady Michelle Obama present new initiative together at June 5 press conference.

In an effort to combat America’s escalating childhood obesity problem, the Walt Disney Company, together with First Lady Michelle Obama, announced on June 5 its plan to remove junk-food advertising from its kids’ programming by 2015.

This initiative, presented by Disney CEO Robert Iger at the Newseum in Washington, will require companies advertising food and drinks to meet a set of nutrition standards in accordance with the government’s dietary guidelines. By 2015, when the full ban is slated to be in place, such companies must either reformulate their products or they will be cut off from advertising on all of Disney’s programming.

Disney is a wide-reaching and influential media company, including amongst its many divisions, a leading film studio, the ABC broadcast network, and multiple cable channels. The ban on junk-food advertising will primarily apply to its programming for children, which accounts for millions of dollars of revenue for the company each year.

While this initiative may represent a loss of money for Disney, it is not expected to be a significant amount relative to the company’s total operations. This small cost is seen as a smart business move for the positive publicity that this initiative will afford the company.

When a food or drink product meets Disney’s nutrition standards, it will receive a Mickey Check, a symbol also newly introduced as a part of Tuesday’s announcement. Additionally, Disney plans to revamp its menu items and offer more fruit and vegetable options at its domestic theme parks by next year.

Mickey Check

Food and drink items will receive a Mickey Check when they meet Disney's nutrition standards.

Disney is being lauded for its acknowledgement of media’s heavy influence on children, particularly in junk-food advertising, as well as, its commitment to battling childhood obesity. Such was the draw for Michelle Obama’s involvement, who has made fighting childhood obesity a cornerstone of her time in office.

In her statement at the press conference, Obama praised Disney remarking, “This is a major American company, a global brand, that is literally changing the way it does business so that our kids can lead healthier lives. With this new initiative Disney is doing what no major media company has done before in the United States and what I hope every company will do going forward.”

This initiative is the first time that a wide-scale media company is taking control of what food products are being advertised to children. Some believe that with this ban, Disney may completely change the landscape of food marketing toward children with other stations such as Nickelodeon and the Cartoon Network anticipated to take notice and act accordingly.

Panache Partners Breathe Life Into Print Industry without Dependence on Marketing

Written by: Alexis Poole

 

Panache Partners and Signature Publishing Group have rejuvenated the print and publishing industries. And they’ve done it organically, by creating a product that pools creative talent and practically markets itself among affluent, on-the-verve communities. They’ve even created jobs in printing and publishing that allow the industries to experience growth.

In 2002, Brian Carabet and John Shand pooled together their 25 years of experience and created the now internationally acclaimed Design by City series, Spectacular Homes series and Perspective on Design series, along with a host of other coffee-table book series stretching from North America to Canada to London. Panache even custom-designs look-books to fit clientele tastes and needs.

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Brian Carabet and John Shand created the City by Design Series in 2002.

The books are published by sister company Signature Publishing and distributed by Independent Publishers Group, which was the first to market titles solely from independent presses to the book trade. Since 1987, IPG has operated under the Chicago Review Press and has enjoyed many successes with clients spanning the globe. For all their efforts, Panache Partners are experiencing great success and growth. Even better, the company is headquartered in Plano, Texas, a bustling Dallas suburb that is affluent with an elevated cost of living and operations. In Plano, Panache finds a great audience to whom they can market and almost assuredly experience success.

But the thing that sets Panache apart from others is their product. Panache creates the most visually-appealing, creativity-inspiring, luxurious-feeling coffee-table books. They practically open themselves up to a wide audience, from the architect looking for samples of what a particular region might find warm and inviting, to the orthodontist looking for an interesting book to keep her waiting patients occupied. It is the product–hundreds of high-detail, oversized photos on slick, high-quality paper–that markets better than any agency ever could. By organically engaging the senses with a well-made product, Panache created the look-book that doesn’t need a commercial or a billboard to sell it. A product that can sell itself liberates a company from too much of a dependence on marketing and advertising. With more than 40 titles of coffee-table books, Panache can focus its money on Research and Development, pumping more of their resources into travel and photography, writing and editing, print production and finishing–creating jobs in the writing, printing and publishing industries that are in direct competition with their online counterparts.

And when the book is done, every description wittily and stylishly written, every photo oversized and in eye-popping detail, every spine, cover and page offering that visceral texture, scent and aura of a high-quality, well-made item–the coffee-table books put traditional marketing to shame and sell themselves, by referral only.